There are no rules.

by Candace Rowell on March 26, 2012

The only rule is that there are no rules. There may be guidelines. But there are no rules.

I like rules, even if it’s just for the principle of breaking them. I enjoy rules. Communication, especially through social media, is not bound by rules. It’s an art not an exact science. It’s subjective and dynamic. It’s challenging. The last 10 weeks have been very challenging.

Reflecting back over my last 10 posts, I finally see what my biggest challenges really were.

1)  Terror. I’m at a point in my education where I am leaving the protection of the classroom and I’m emerging as an expert. People think I’m an expert. This is terrifying.  At times when I was writing a post, I had a glimpse of the terror. Shudder.

2)   Meaning. It means something to me. It means something to me to have you really see the story I am telling and really connect with the message. It’s challenging to be satisfied with words when those words are representing something meaningful.

3)   You. You, the anonymous audience are a challenge. It’s all about you. What you’ll read, what you’ll like, what you won’t like, how to capture you. You are a challenge and you are powerful. But you are very rewarding and I thank you very much for your responses and comments – I have learned so much from you.

It was a challenging task – but I had help. Melissa Strickland, Nora Kuiper, and Seema Jolly diligently read and critiqued each post pre-publish. Holla ladies. A special thanks to Melissa for dealing with me when I was in the “beyond.” For those who don’t know of the “beyond” – it’s that place you go when you decide, “well, I’m just not going to post tomorrow.” For the record, I never skipped a post.

One more thanks to all readers and commenters. A couple comments have really stuck with me:

  • PFAnderson’s guidance on citing images! I have no excuse to ever get this wrong.
  • Maryse’s advice given on my very first post: don’t narrow my audience and always try to continue the story into the “what next stage.”

Hope everyone has enjoyed their MTSG experience. I have.

Ginny Kendall March 26, 2012 at 3:44 pm

Candace,
This post made me want to reach out and give you a big hug! Don’t let the term “expert” terrify you. I deal with lots of “experts” (some are, some only think they are), but they are all human. No one is more loveable than when they show their humanity. As long as you do your best in your field, and don’t ever believe that you know it all, you have nothing to fear. I wish you the best!
(And, yes, I am a mother and a grandmother).

PF Anderson March 30, 2012 at 10:15 am

Ditto! I am smiling and laughing at your comment, “I have no excuse to ever get this wrong.” I was getting SO SICK of hearing myself talk about giving proper attribution to sources, but this made it worth it. Thank you. But I especially treasure your central paragraph here:

“Meaning. It means something to me. It means something to me to have you really see the story I am telling and really connect with the message. It’s challenging to be satisfied with words when those words are representing something meaningful.”

Bless you. It makes a difference. Keep it up. Stay humble, keep listening, but don’t let that stop you from engendering and joining conversations. Bravo!

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: